Alliance Medical Ministry teams up for greater impact

By Todd Cohen

RALEIGH, N.C. — When patients at its health clinic want to improve their job skills or change jobs, Alliance Medical Ministry in Raleigh refers them to StepUp Ministry Raleigh, which offers a life-skills program to job-seekers.

And when StepUp clients lack health insurance, the agency refers them to Alliance, which provides comprehensive primary medical care to working adults in Wake County who are uninsured.

“If you have access to healthy community initiatives and social supports, it will increase patients’ ability to address health issues and life issues,” says Megg Rader, president and executive director of Alliance.

To help raise awareness of their collaborative work, and generate funds to help support it, Alliance  and StepUp this fall piloted “Share the Pie,” selling 500 donated pies for Thanksgiving.

The effort, which recruited professional bakers from restaurants, caterers and bakers in Raleigh and Cary, raised $12,500 and likely will be expanded next year.

Founded in 2001 and operating with an annual  budget of $1.4 million, 17 employees and 250 active volunteers, Alliance serves about 4,000 patients. In addition to comprehensive primary care, it provides lab work donated by Rex Healthcare and medicine either at reduced cost or free.

And in partnership with at least 20 organizations, Alliance increasingly is focusing on the interconnectedness between health, wellness, jobs and poverty.

It also is working to connect patients to information and resources for healthy food, exercise, physical activity and other support services such as job training, child care and transportation to address barriers to economic stability for people in need.

Alliance is one of five agencies in Wake County that are piloting a “community-centered health home” model — one of 12 pilot programs throughout the state supported by the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina Foundation.

Alliance and YMCA of Triangle already have piloted the kind of program the model is looking for. Alliance now refers its patients in southast Raleigh who are identified as pre-diabetic to a diabetes-prevention program that YMCA of the Triangle piloted at the Alexander Family YMCA on Hillsborough Street and then piloted with Alliance for its patients in southeast Raleigh.

Through The Family Table, a separate but overlapping initiative supported by United Way of the Greater Triangle, Alliance is one of six partner agencies that connect clients to one another and collect data to identify support services to better serve clients.

The Food Pantry at Catholic Charities, for example, assesses the employment needs of clients, and then might refer them to StepUp or Dress for Success, partner agencies that can provide them with job-training classes or programs to develop their skills in applying for jobs.

Other partners in the pilot program, which serves 50 families in southeast Raleigh, are Child Care Services Associates and the Wake County Boys and Girls Clubs.

Generating over $1 million a year in contributions, Alliance in May 2014 launched Alliance Circle, a giving program that 30 women have joined by agreeing to give $100 a month for two years, or a total of $2,400 each, enough to support the health of three women at Alliance.

Alliance also generates income from two events it hosts in alternate years — a “Farm to Table” dinner that raised $125,000 this past spring, and “In Her Shoes,” a women’s leadership luncheon that will be held next spring and focuses on women’s health and overcoming barriers to women’s health.

“All these organizations that are serving vulnerable populations have so much crossover,” Rader says. “We work on health, but unless we connect health to all these other issues people are facing, we’re really not going to move forward.”

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In shift, Rex eyes major donors, campaigns

By Todd Cohen

RALEIGH, N.C. — In June, celebrating its 25th year, the Rex Hospital Open netted $440,000 for the Rex Healthcare Foundation.

Also celebrating its 25th year, the Rex Gala this November expects to net over $125,000 for the Foundation.

While it will continue to focus on those two signature events to raise money for Rex Healthcare, the Foundation is expanding its fundraising strategy to include greater focus on individual donors, including those who give $2,500 or more.

It also is launching six “mini-campaigns” to fund a series of initiatives over the next three years, and gearing up for two capital campaigns to support a new cancer hospital and a new heart-and-vascular hospital that are in the works.

“This community is growing and we have to keep up with the healthcare demands,” says Amy Daniels, a seven-year veteran of the Foundation who recently was named its executive director. “We’re really planning what that means for the Foundation.”

Formed in 1958, the Foundation operates with a staff of eight people, including six involved in fundraising, and raised over $2.3 million in the fiscal year that ended June 30.

As it moves to increase its focus on individual donors, the Foundation is looking at “current donors and prospects who call Rex their home for healthcare, educating them on what Rex does, bringing them in for tours, and sitting down face-to-face and talking about what the community needs, what they need, and how we can meet those needs at Rex,” Daniels says.

The Foundation is working with consulting firm Capital Development Services on plans for its six mini-campaigns.

The goals include raising $300,000 over three years for assistance for cancer patients; $300,000 over three years for assistance for all other patients; $200,000 over three years for certification and continuing education for nurses; $900,000 over three years to make the services of its two mobile mammography units accessible to uninsured and underinsured women in a 17-county region; launching a new program to support cancer survivors, an effort for which a goal has not been set; and $600,000 over three years to support newborn care.

“These are all programs that strengthen Rex,” Daniels says. “These are touching people’s lives here every day.”

Fundraising at Rex, which opened in 1894, dates to an $11,000 bequest gift in 1839 from Raleigh tanner John Rex to start the hospital.

Rex, an arm of UNC Hospitals that operates with 660 beds and 5,300 employees and sees nearly 34,000 patients a year, has been awarded certificates of need for a new $60 million cancer hospital and a new $278 million heart-and-vascular hospital, which is under appeal.

The Foundation will play a role in raising the money to support the two new facilities, Daniels says.

“Rex has been well-known for our events, and that’s a great branding opportunity,” she says. “There’s a shift underway to start speaking to people on a very personal basis and start showing them what other things are out there.”