Nonprofit works to help homeless families find stability

By Todd Cohen

RALEIGH, N.C. — Two years ago, PLM Families Together provided emergency housing for homeless families at 33 Raleigh apartments it owned and leased.

But the nonprofit found that, even though its program was intended to provide short-term housing for families in crisis, they tended to settle in rather than working aggressively to “move on to their own permanent place,” says Beth Bordeaux, executive director of the nonprofit.

Short-term housing creates more of a “home-like” environment than many homeless families have been used to, and it becomes easy to begin to build their lives around the “illusion” of a sense of stability and in the process lose a “sense of urgency,” she says.

“The sense of urgency is what’s necessary to make change happen,” she says. “We want  that stability to start when people are in their own place, not our place.”

To help keep its client families motivated to rebuild their lives, she says, PLM Families Together decided a year ago to reduce the number of apartments it used for emergency housing and expand its program by providing “rehousing” services.

Those services, consisting of financial support and intensive case management support, are designed to get families out of emergency housing  and into their own apartments.

The new strategy, launched in February, has begun to show results: In the fiscal year that ended June 30, the agency moved roughly 70 families into permanent housing, up from 57 families a year earlier.

“One of the difficulties that families have is dealing with those initial expenses of moving in,” Bordeaux says.

“The families we work with all have income,” she says. “Most of them are working families. They’re at a place or close to a place where they can afford to live in an apartment they lease themselves.”

But they typically experience an “event,” such as the loss of a job or a car, a medical issue, or even the loss of an apartment because a landlord ran into financial difficulty, she says, that “pushes them over the edge” and leaves them homeless.

PLM Families Services still owns eight apartments, including six for families and two it uses for offices, and leases another four apartments.

And it provides financial support to help families move out of its short-term housing and into their own apartments, plus rent for the first few months in their new apartments, as well as case management services for a year.

Those services include meetings at least once a week, at least initially, and assistance in creating and following a household budget; determining how big an apartment the family needs and can afford; reviewing the lease; and meeting and learning how to work with a landlord.

A mentor advocate from the agency also attends the lease signing to provide any support or information the family may need.

Operating with an annual budget of $800,000 and a staff of seven people, plus volunteer interns from schools of social work at Triangle universities, PLM Families Together over the past three years has reduced to 50 percent from 60 percent the share of its funding from government, and aims to reduce it even more this year, with the remainder coming from private support.

This year, it raised $130,000 in its first-ever annual campaign.

And on October 24, it will host a fundraising dinner and evening of jazz at the Brownstone DoubleTree on Hillsborough Street in Raleigh. The event last year raised roughly $100,000.

“Government money is not always going to be stable money,” Bordeaux says. “It’s also good business to have a diversified funding stream.”

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Community solutions to homelessness urged

By Todd Cohen

[Note: I am working with Triangle Community Foundation as senior communications adviser.]

MORRISVILLE, N.C. — While homelessness can seem beyond any solution, efforts to reduce it are working.

Actually ending homelessness, however, will take truly collaborative community efforts that require patience and hard work, and are well designed, driven by incentives and shared goals, and tracked with useful metrics that show the impact of those efforts.

That was the message of four experts who work on homelessness issues and served on a panel at the April meeting of the Triangle Donors Forum.

Hosted by Triangle Community Foundation and United Way of the Greater Triangle at United Way’s offices in Morrisville, the Forum offered a window into local efforts to fight homelessness by adapting to changes in the funding environment and in perspectives about the causes of the problem and effective strategies to address it.

Roots of homelessness

Characterizing homelessness as “one of the most complex societal problems,” Denise Neunaber, executive director of the North Carolina Coalition to End Homelessness, told the Donors Forum the keys to ending the problem all are rooted in access — to affordable housing, to services and to income.

In the early 1980s, she said, homelessness was treated as an “emergency situation”  and a problem that eventually would “go away.”

Declines in the development of affordable housing and in wages, however, along with changes in the mental health system and other social forces, have resulted in the spread of homelessness, she said.

Yet the system created to fight homelessness, rooted in the belief it was a temporary crisis, has “taken on a life of its own,” she said.

Shifting strategies

The system that emerged to serve homeless people operated below the “safety net” to “catch people when the safety net doesn’t work,” Neunaber said.

But that system became a kind of “sticky net.”

“We created a system where you need to get services while you’re there,” she said, creating few exits for people in temporary housing who needed ongoing assistance.

But that system should be a “trampoline,” she said, to stabilize their housing while they get other support, including assistance with rent and in securing jobs or disability benefits, or services such as mental health programs or case management.

“People fall out of housing into our system and we try to bounce them back into housing and services,” she said.

Ultimately, she said, getting people out of homelessness requires permanent housing.

“Instead of investing just in services and a temporary place for individuals and families to stay,” she said, “we’re taking it to the next level, investing in housing, in rental assistance and security deposits, to see how quickly we can get people out of the system.”

Homelessness and poverty

Perceptions about what it means to be homeless also have changed, Neunaber said.

For many years, advocates equated fighting homelessness with fighting poverty, believing they had to address the poverty of homeless individuals and families by helping them “get better jobs and make better decisions, ” she said, “and make them better people.”

But over the years, advocates have recognized that “maybe ending homelessness is not the same as ending poverty,” she said. “Maybe ending homelessness is a piece of getting to the next step of ending poverty. We may not be able to end poverty for these individuals and families, but I know we can end  homelessness.”

Neunaber said local partnerships to end homelessness had helped reduce the number of chronically homeless individuals and families in communities across North Carolina, including a declines of 35 percent in Durham, 58 percent in Winston-Salem and and 82 percent in Buncombe County.

‘Rapid Rehousing’

Strategies for serving the homeless more recently have evolved to a “Housing First” model that includes a “Rapid Rehousing” approach focusing on first getting homeless people housed and then providing the services they need to get back on their feet and build stable lives.

“It shortens the time they’re homeless,” Terry Allebaugh, executive director of Housing for New Hope in Durham, told the Donors Forum.

Beth Bordeaux, executive director of PLM Families Together in Raleigh, told the Donors Forum that the Rapid Rehousing strategy also provides an incentive for families not to prolong their stays in emergency housing but rather to begin to prepare themselves to move into longer-term housing.

“First we get them stable,” she said. “If your life is in chaos, the first thing you want is to reduce your stress.”

Allebaugh and Bordeaux both said Rapid Rehousing has helped their agencies house more people for less money.

Last year, for example, PLM Families Together moved 57 families into permanent housing, and this year expects to move 70 families into permanent housing.

And in partnership with three core agencies that provide support services and temporary housing , Housing for New Hope housed 173 households in permanent housing over the two-and-a-half-year period ended August 2012, with 89 percent of those households remaining housed.

Community solutions

Advocates at the Donors Forum said the most effective approaches to fighting homelessness involve community-based partnerships that address the problem from the perspective of the systems that serve homeless people.

Those systems range from job-training and financial-literacy services to those serving people with mental illness or substance abuse problems, or both, and people after they are discharged from military service or prison.

“You can’t end homelessness in a silo,” Bordeaux said.

Bernadette Pelissier, a member of the Orange County Board of Commissioners and of the Orange County Partnership to End Homelessness, told the Donors Forum that homelessness is a byproduct of national policies on a range of issues such as poverty and mental health, and that efforts to address homelessness are supported by multiple funding streams.

So partnerships to fight homelessness should approach the problem from a “systems” perspective.

In Orange County, she said, that approach has produced promising partnerships.

The local Partnership to End Homelessness, for example, has enlisted partners such as an assistant district attorney whose efforts helped establish a local “outreach court.”

That court, which has engaged students at the School of Law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, along with other partners, encouraged homeless people who have been arrested for misdemeanors to take advantage of local services, particularly mental health services.

And a local jobs program works to encourage local businesses to hire people released from prison who may be at risk of homelessness. That effort represents a collaboration between local partners such as the Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership and Chamber of Commerce, and is administered by a new nonprofit led by students at UNC-Chapel Hill.

“We’re engaging the community,” Pelissier said, “not just providers” of services.

Critical to local collaborative programs, she said, is the ability to track and measure their impact.

Focus on collaboration

The session underscored the growing focus of Triangle Community Foundation and United Way to work more collaboratively to address urgent needs in the region.

“We have to do it together, think collaboratively,” Lori O’Keefe, president of Triangle Community Foundation, told the Donors Forum. “We don’t have to be the experts. We look for resources and partners.”

Mack Koonce, president and CEO of United Way, told the Donors Forum that collaborative thinking “is important to all our social issues.”

United Way, he said, is “going to work closely with other foundations and individuals to work collaboratively on the donor side and on the service delivery side.”

He said United Way plans to raise “designated dollars to do the next systemic change” in the area of financial stability for families, an effort he said would “keep this going” through “collaboration, the use of data, and scaling what works.”