Nonprofit news roundup, 02.23.18

Diversity linked to more engaged nonprofit boards

Members of nonprofit boards with a bigger share of women tend to participate more in fundraising and advocacy, and to be more involved in the board’s work, a new study says.

Boards with a bigger share of members age 39 and younger are more committd and involved, and engage more in oversight and governance, says the study, The Impact of Diversity: Understanding How Nonprofit Board Diversity Affects Philanthropy, Leadership and Board Engagement.

The study, conducted by the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University in partnership with Johnson, Grossnickle and Associates, and BoardSource, also finds that:

* Boards of nonprofits founded before 1900 are less diverse than those of newer, smaller organizations.

* A significantly higher share of members of boards of older organizations meet with potential donors, ask  others for money, and contribute financial gifts.

* The diversity of a nonprofit’s board is related to the subsector in which the nonprofit operates. Boards of nonprofits that focus on education, for example, tend to higher shares of African-American members.

* Boards of nonprofits with annual revenues of $5 million ore more are more likely to participate in advocacy.

Saffer new executive director at Executive Service Corps

Anne Saffer, director of consultant development for Executive Service Corps of the Triangle, has been named executive director, succeeding Trudy Smith, who served for nearly 12 years.

Schline to head Carolinas Credit Union League

Dan Schline, senior vice president of the Carolinas Credit Union League, has been named  president and CEO, effective July 1, on the retirement of John Radebaugh, who has held the position since 2003.

School of the Arts gets $3 million from estate

The University of North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem has received a gift of $3 million from the estate of an anonymous donor to support merit-based scholarships in the School of Music.

Kidznotes raises $117,000

Kidznotes in Durham raises over $110,000 for young musicians at an event February 17 at The Umstead.

JDRF to honor Mary Gay and Don Brady

The Piedmont Triad Chapter of JDRF will honor Mary Gay and Don Brady, founder and chairman of Brady Services, at the 2018 Hope Gala on February 24 at Koury Convention Center in Greensboro.

A live auction at the event will include bidding on an “Ultimate Kitchen Makeover” with an estimated value of $50,000.

Now in its 18th year and alternating between Greensboro and Winston-Salem, the event  in its first 17 years raised roughly $14.5 million to fund type 1 diabetes research, including at least $1 million in six of the last seven years.

Partnership focuses on minority middle-school males

Two Saturdays of every month, about 110 middle-school boys participate at a program at N.C. A&T State University offered through a partnership between the school and the Verizon Foundation through the foundation’s national program that focuses on providing tech education and skill-building skills to minority, middle-school male students in partnership Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Hispanic Serving Institutions On February 10, A&T and Verizon partnered with science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals to provide real-world career experiences during the “Preparing Tomorrow’s Innovators Today” conference on the university’s campus.

Winston-Salem State raises $21,000 in state employee campaign

Faculty, staff and administration at Winston-Salem State University donating $20,743 during the annual State Employees Combined Campaign, with 18 percent of full-time employees participating.

Eastern Music Festival gets $20,000

Eastern Music Festival received $20,000 in scholarship funding from the Louis DeJoy and Aldona Z. Wos Family Foundation to provide scholarship assistance for up to 12North Carolina musicians ages 14 to 23 studying at Eastern Music Festival this summer.

Salvation Army gets $10,000, food to fight hunger

The Salvation Army of High Point has received a $10,000 donation from the Rotary Club of High Point through its 2nd annual “Designs to Fight Hunger” campaign to support the Salvation Army’s food pantry, plus 1,550 donated food items the Club purchased for $2,100.

Athenian House set to open

Athenian Press & Workshops, a Wilmington nonprofit that works to provide a safe space for women and femme-identified writers, artists and creators, has established its official location, known at Athenian House, at 2231 Wrightsville Ave.

Athenian will celebrate its grand opening on March 25.

When fully operational, the main floor of Athenian House will serve as a bookstore and lounge.

All books, artwork and literary merchandise it sells or features will be created and authored by women and femme-identifying artists.

Academic resources such as computers and books will be available for clients seeking free resources.

Public art light installation in Winston-Salem

The Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County is partnering with the North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center and Clean Air Carolina to sponsor a multi-story public art light installation in downtown Winston-Salem through March 24.

Best viewing of the display, “Particle Falls,”  which will use the west wall of the Stevens Center as a projection screen, is in the evening from the corner of West 4th Street and Spruce Street.

Family Service to host oyster roast

Family Service of the Piedmont in James town will host its 24th annual High Point Oyster Roast on March 2 from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Presented by the Lenny Peters Foundation and Bethany Medical Center, and co-chaired by Frosty Culp and Caren York, the event will be held at a private home. To purchase tickets, visit http://www.OysterRoast.info.

The 2017 Oyster Roast attracted 550 people generated $202,000 in net proceeds to support High Point programs of Family Service of the Piedmont.

NCCJ accepting nominations for award

March 12 at 5 p.m. is the deadline for submitting nominations to the National Conference for Community and Justice of the Piedmont Triad in Greensboro for its 2018 Brotherhood/Sisterhood Citation Award.

NCCJ will present the award at its 52nd Annual Brotherhood/Sisterhood Citation Award Dinner on November 7 at the Koury Convention Center.

Raffaldini heads Bookmarks board

Barbara Raffaldini, a partner in the law firm of Pachter, Gregory & Raffaldini, has been named president of the board of Bookmarks in Winston-Salem.

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Nonprofit news roundup, 02.16.18

Women lead most small-staffed foundations

Two thirds of top administrators at thinly-staffed foundations are women who earn, on average, 84 cents for every dollar paid to men, a new report says.

And 39 percent of leanly-staffed foundations include non-white board members, while 33 percent have non-white staff, says the 2018 Foundation Operations and Management Report from Exponent Philanthropy, a foundation association with nearly 2,000 members.

School of Arts receives $1 million for music school

The School of Music at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem has received a gift of $1 million from the estate of artist and philanthropist Jenny Lillian Semans Koortbojian, daughter of school founders, advocates and benefactors Dr. James H. Semans and Mary D.B.T. Semans, to endow merit-based scholarships.

James Semans was the first chairman of the school’s board of trustees, and Mary Semans mother served on the board for over 20 years. Koortbojian’s nephew, Charles Lucas, also served as trustees chair and recently completed 19 years of service on the board.

High Point University gets $250,000 for Veterans Day celebration

High Point University has received a $250,000 gift from the parents of a student to establish an endowment to support the annual Veterans Day Celebration at the school.

Alan and Karen Sheriff of Newtown, Pa., are the parents of sophomore Daniel J. Sheriff, who serves in the United States Marine Corps.

Winston-Salem State expanding mobile clinic

Winston-Salem State University has received a $170,294 grant from the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust that it will use to expand services and hours of its mobile clinic.

Starting in January, the Rams Know H.O.W. Mobile Clinic, a service of WSSU’s Center of Excellence for the Elimination of Health Disparities, began offering free expanded clinical services, including medical services; school and work physicals; some vaccinations; STD/STI screenings; pregnancy screenings; and behavioral health screening and counseling.

With the grant, the mobile clinic now will offer services four days a week at various locations in East Winston.

The expansion is made possible through a partnership between WSSU, United Health Centers and Southside Discount Pharmacy.

Cooking event generates $70,000 for Lucy Daniels Center

The Lucy Daniels Center in Raleigh is getting $70,000 from its second annual Cooking for a Classic fundraising event, which this year featured a competition among eight local chefs.

Eastern Music Festival to host gala, honor Bryan

Eastern Music Festival will host its 3rd Annual Spring Scholarship Gala, The Magic of the Music, on March 2, to raise scholarship funds for young artists to study at EMF, and will honor Joseph M. Bryan Jr. for his long-time support.

The event will be held at The Cadillac Service Garage in downtown Greensboro.

Bryan joined the Festival’s board of directors in 1979 and has served 35 years as member of the board member and executive, as board chair and, at the board’s request, as volunteer interim executive director. Since 2016, he has served on the board as an honorary member.

Women in Motion partnering with Marsh Furniture

Marsh Furniture has contributing $5,000 to Women in Motion, an initiative of the High Point Community Foundation, and in return Women in Motion will provide or connect female employees at Marsh’s 600-person headquarters and factory with professional development opportunities, including mentoring, training and networking with local businesswomen. About a third of Marsh’s employees are women.

RiverRun gets $10,000 challenge

RiverRun International Film Festival in Winston-Salem has received a $10,000 challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Arts for its year-round RiverRun Retro series.

Crisis Control Ministry to hold cereal drive

Crisis Control Ministry in Winston-Salem will hold its 18th annual “Wee Care! Cereal Drive” from March 1 to 23, with elementary schools, preschools and day-care centers throughout Forsyth County collecting cereal to be distributed through the organization’s Client Choice Food Pantries in Winston-Salem and Kernersville.

In last year’s drive, participating students in 30 schools collected over 1,900 boxes of cereal.

Surry Community College gets $3,000

Surry Community College received a $3,000 grant from the Gene Haas Foundation for its computer-integrated machining program.

John Deere partners with Wake Habitat

For the second straight fiscal year, John Deere has sponsored two homes for Wake Habitat — one built last fall in Fuquay-Varina, another just completed in Holly Springs.

John Deere is only corporate sponsor in Habitat Wake’s 33-year history to sponsor two homes in a year.

Winston-Salem Foundation gives $429,000

The Winston-Salem Foundation has awarded 21 grants totaling $428,876 to programs that serve people living in Forsyth County and focus on arts and culture; community and economic development; health, human services; public interest; and recreation.

Barnabas Network elects five board members

The Barnabas Network in Greensboro has elected five board members, including

Robert Green, senior vice president for wealth management at UBS; retired attorney Courtney Murchison; Rick Ramsey, operating partner at New Page Capital and president of Engineered Steel Products; attorney Tom Duncan; and Harriette Knox, communications coordinator at Canterbury School.

Carying Place to host annual benefit auction

The Carying Place in Cary will host its Annual Benefit Auction and Special 25th Anniversary Celebration on April 21 at 6 p.m.

Willingham to chair 2018 REX Hospital Open

Ed Willingham, chief operating officer at First Citizens Bank in Raleigh, will serve as chairman of the 2018 REX Hospital Open, to be held May 31 to June 23 at TPC Wakefield Plantation.

Last year, which marked the 30th year of REX charity golf, the event netted over $470,000 for the REX Healthcare Foundation.

 

Nonprofit news roundup, 02.09.18

Employers, workers see value in family-friendly practices, study says

Employers and employees believe family-friendly practices help businesses attract and retain talented workers, and keep companies strong, new research finds.

Ninety-four percent of North Carolina employees believe family-friendly practices help businesses attract and retain talent, and 71 percent of business leaders in the state see just as much benefit for employers from family-friendly practices as for employees, according to research by the NC Early Childhood Foundation.

Based on interviews with over 300 employers in the state, and surveys with 300 employees from small, medium and large businesses, the research also finds that nearly half of employers in the state plan on strengthening family-friendly practices next year.

The research also shows that many employers and employees have a narrow definition of family-friendly practices.

The research is part of a new initiative, Family Forward NC, that aims to improve children’s health and well-being, and keep North Carolina’s businesses competitive.

St. Andrews, Scotia Village get $2.7 million from estate

St. Andrews University and Scotia Village retirement community, both in Laurinburg, have received gifts totaling over $2.7 million over the past two years from the estate of  John D. Currie Jr., who was a long-time trustee of St. Andrews and was a resident of Scotia Village when he died in 2014.

The gift to St. Andrews University has been used in large part to support academic programs and for capital improvements to the campus. The the balance is being used to establish a named professorship.

The gift directed to Scotia Village will benefit its Caring and Sharing Endowment that provides financial assistance for residents who have outlived their personal financial resources.

Pope Foundation awards $100,000 arts and human-service grants

The John William Pope Foundation in Raleigh awarded grants of $100,000 each to Stokes County Arts Council in Danbury and Haywood Pathways Center in Waynesville.

Stokes Arts will use its 2018 Joy W. Pope Memorial Grant in the Arts to complete phase two construction of The Arts Place of Stokes, a multi-purpose community arts facility that opened in 2017.

Haywood Pathways Center will use the 2018 Joy W. Pope Memorial Grant in Human Services to help fund the construction of an emergency and short-term shelter that will be the only emergency housing in Haywood County for homeless women with children and will be able to accommodate up to 10 families at a time.

Greensboro Community Foundation launches Social Impact pool

The Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro has established a sustainable investment pool to hold only investments that meet criteria committed to responsible environmental, social, and corporate governance practices, known as “ESG.”

The new Social Impact pool, which the Foundation has seeded with a $1 million investment, has a long-term focus is available for current and future fundholders.

“We have seen an increasing interest in ESG investing for charitable funds,”

John Englar, chair of the Foundation’s investment committee, says in a statement. “In the past, there has been a perception that socially conscious investors were sacrificing portfolio performance; however, firms that score high on ESG criteria are typically well managed across the board, giving a portfolio of these companies the potential to outperform non-selective investment pools.”

Initial holdings in the Social Impact pool include Vanguard FTSE Social Index, Boston Common International, and the TIAA CREF Social Core Bond funds.

Foundation for a Healthy High Point awards $645,000

Foundation for a Healthy High Point approved $645,399 in grant awards to 12 organizations to support projects that focus on teen pregnancy prevention and early intervention; behavioral health; and other services.

Since the Foundation was established in 2013, it has awarded $7.4 million in grants.

V Foundation gets $110,000 from Pepsi Bottling Venture

Pepsi Bottling Ventures raised $110,741 for cancer research in 2017 through a program launched in 2013 in which customers donate their commission of Jimmy V v ending machines to the V Foundation for Cancer Research in Cry.

The effort has raised a total of $333,772 over five years.

Lindsay, Benton co-chairs for arts campaign

Cheryl Lindsay, director of human resources and inclusion/diversity at Hanesbrands, and Bill Benton, chairman and CEO of Salem Senior Housing, have been named campaign co-chairs of the 2018 Community Fund for the Arts for the Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County.

Page honored by N.C. A&T

Bob Page, chairman and CEO of Replacements Ltd., the world’s largest retailer of vintage and current china, crystal, silver and collectibles, is the recipient of the 2018 Human Rights Medal from N.C. A&T State University.

Page, a long-time activist and leader for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights, received the medal on February 1 during the 58th February One Sit-In Celebration at the Alumni Foundation Event Center.

Walk event raises $57,000 for Mental Health Association

The 3rd Annual Shea’s Chase 5K Run/Walk on Nov. 4 2017, generated a net donation of nearly $57,000 for the Mental Health Association in Greensboro, up from $44,000 in 2015 and $48,000 in 2016.

The 4th annual walk will be held November 10 at 11 a.m.

School of Undergraduate Sciences named for Waneks

High Point University will name its School of Undergraduate Sciences for Todd Wanek, CEO of Ashley Furniture, and Karen Wanek, president of Superior Fresh.

Davidson County Schools getting bleeding-control kits [photo]

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma have donated a total of 91 bleeding-control kits to all 36 schools in the Davidson County School system and all five schools in the Thomasville City School system, along with the necessary training to school nurses and school resource officers.

Wake Forest Baptist already donated 200 kits to the North Carolina Highway Patrol and another 100 to the Winston-Salem Police Department.

Hospitality House aims to raise $85,000

Hospitality House of Charlotte will kick off its 4th Annual “Queen City Corporate Challenge” fundraising campaign on February 15 and has set a goal of raising $85,000. Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina, the campaign will run through March 22. The Leon Levine Foundation will provide a challenge match of $20,000 if Hospitality House meet its campaign goal.

A Place at the Table gets support for meals

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina is making a contribution to A Place at the Table in Raleigh to assist with upfront operational expenses to provide 20 meals a day for 365 days to people in need.

Nonprofit news roundup, 12.01.17

Donor retention declining

The overall rate of retention of charitable donors has fallen this year from last year, and is expected to continue dropping through the end of the year, a new report says

Overall donor retention fell to 32.6 percent for the first nine months of 2017, down from 34.5 percent in the same period last year, says the Fundraising Effectiveness Project Quarterly Report.

For the first six months of 2017, overall donor retention fell to 28.1 percent from 28.7 percent in the same period last year, says the report, which is based on data, from five fundraising software firms, on 4.8 million U.S. donors who gave a total of $4.69 billion.

The retention rate among previous-year donors, other than new donors, fell to 45 percent for the first nine months of this year, compared to 48 percent for same period each of the last four years.

That retention rate has declined each year since 2013, and is expected to drop again in 2017, the report says.

“If this downward trend in retention continues, the cost of fundraising will certainly increase with it,” the Fundraising Effectiveness Project says in a statement.

For the first nine months of the year, the retention rate for new donors was 17.6 percent, down from 23.2 percent for the same period last year, when it reached the highest level in five years.

Elizabeth Boris, director of Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy at the Urban Institute and a member of the steering committee for the Fundraising Effectiveness Project, says some fundraising experts believe “there’s not been enough effort made to build a relationship and communicate with donors outside fundraising.”

Those experts believe “nonprofits have to do a better job keeping in touch with their donors, and communicating with them when they’re not asking for money, and helping them care about the organization,” she says.

Among many factors that may be affecting donor retention, nonprofits also may be “getting used to doing one-off social-media giving,” Boris says. “If you’re just relying on social media, it’s not a way to build trust and long-term relationships.”

But she adds, “There’s a lot we don’t know.”

Gift donations of over $1,000 fell eight percent in the three months ended September 30, compared to the same period last year, while overall giving for the first nine months of 2017 fell four percent, compared to the same period in 2016, the report says.

Donations under $250 grew 6.9 percent in the third quarter, compared to the same period last year, and donations of $250 to $1,000 grew 21 percent, but those increases likely reflect a response to natural disasters in the three-month period, the report says.

The Fundraising Effectiveness Project, launched in 2006 by the Association of Fundraising Professionals and the Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy at the Urban Institute, is based on data from by five donor software firms, with the report produced by two data-processing-and-analytics firms.

Bank of America gives $2.8 million in Charlotte

Bank of America awarded $2.8 million in grants to 36 nonprofits working in Charlotte to address the roots of economic mobility.

It also named the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Housing Partnership and Men’s Shelter of Charlotte the 2017 recipients of its Neighborhood Builders awards.

For each of those two nonprofits, the bank will provides leadership development for the executive director and a developing leader, $200,000 in flexible funding, a network of peer organizations across the U.S., and access to capital to expand their impact in the  community.

Food drive generates 3,200 meals

The Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina generated over 3,200 meals in its inaugural one-day Caring for the Community Food Drive, hosted and promoted by the Pulse FM in coordination with Carli C’s IGA locations.

Habitat Greensboro to open second ReStore in spring

Habitat Greensboro plans in mid-spring to open a second ReStore on the southeast corner of Lawndale Drive and Cornwallis Drive after the Walgreens Drugstore there closes December 31.

The new location will focus on furniture and do-it-yourself projects from a slightly-smaller space than its other location at 3826 W. Gate City Blvd. that featured new and used appliances, building materials and furniture.

Benefit gala for Carolina Theatre to feature Gladys Knight

Soul singer Gladys Knight will be the featured performer for the 7th Annual Command Performance Benefit Gala on April 19, 2018, that will benefit The Carolina Theatre of Greensboro.

Sponsored by TCDI and VF Corporation, the event will include a dinner at 5:30 p.m. and a concert at 8 p.m.

Co-Chairs for the event are Seth D. Moore of Fidelity Bank and lawyer Don Vaughan of Don R. Vaughan and Associates.

Brady Services first veterans sponsor for Heart Association

Brady Services is the first Guilford County veterans sponsor for the American Heart Association in the Triad and will sponsor a special VIP area for veterans and their families at the Association’s High Point Healthy For Good Expo on February 24 and at the Guilford Heart & Stroke Walk on May 19.

Davidson Hospice honors Young

Philip Young, vice president of business development at Radians Inc. in Thomasville and a former chair of the board of directors of Hospice of Davidson County, was honored by the Hospice board for his service and support to the agency.

Young and his family recently made a donation to the serenity garden just outside Hinkle Hospice House.

EnergyUnited Foundation gives $10,000 for hurricane relief

The EnergyUnited Foundation in Statesville made a $10,000 gift to Samaritan’s Purse to help fund its relief efforts for people in the U.S. and Caribbean affected by hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria.

NC Global Leadership awards $1,000 scholarship

NC Global Leadership in Greensboro, formerly Piedmont Triad Council for International Visitors, has awarded a $1,000 scholarship to Barry “Justin” Spencer, a senior from Huntersville at N.C. A&T State University in Greensboro support his plan to study next semester at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan.

Professional-development available for artists

January 5, 2018, at 5 p.m. is the deadline for artists and collaborative groups in Forsyth, Davie, Davidson, Stokes, Surry, and Yadkin counties to submit applications to the Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County for Duke Energy Regional Artist Project Grants that offer support professional development.

Nonprofit news roundup, 11.17.17

Donor-advised funds surge

Total assets available to donor-advised fund accounts for grantmaking grew 9.7 percent to $85.15 billion in 2016, while grants from donor-advised funds to qualified charities represent four percent of all individual giving and grew 10.4 percent to $15.75 billion for a payout rate of 20.03 percent, a new report says.

Contributions to donor-advised funds grew 7.6 percent to $23.27 billion in 2016, and the number of donor-advised fund accounts grew 6.9 percent to 284,965, says the 2017 Donor-Advised Fund Report from the National Philanthropic Trust.

The average size of donor-advised fund accounts grew 2.6 percent to a record-high $298,809.

Massachusetts was home to 82,643 individual donor-advised funds, the most in any state,  and their grant value totaled $3.1 billion, while contributions to them totaled $5.18 billion, both the highest of any state.

Donor-advised fund charitable assets under management totaled $18.89 billion, the most of any state, while nearly half of all donor-advised fund accounts were sponsored by charities in Massachusetts, California and Pennsylvania.

Donor-advised funds are the fastest growing vehicle for charitable giving in the U.S., the National Philanthropic Trust says.

Giving circles raise nearly $1.3 billion

The number of collective-giving groups, known as giving circles, have tripled since 2007, engaged at least 150,000 individuals in all 50 states, and given up to $1.29 billion, a new study says.

Women represent 70 percent of all giving-circle members, while a specific shared identity, such as gender, race, age or religion, is the basis of 60 percent of all giving circles, says The Landscape of Giving Circles/Collective Giving Groups in the U.S. — 2016, from the Collective Giving Research Group, with support from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University.

While men are members of 66 percent of giving circles, the study says, they represent the majority of members in only 7.5 percent of groups.

The minimum dollar contribution required to join a giving circle ranges from under $20 to $2 million, and the average donation was $1,312, compared to $2,809i 2007.

Twenty-five networks of giving circles have emerged, representing 45 percent of giving circles.

In addition to donations from their members, 52 percent of giving circles receive additional funds from community foundations, corporate partners and other outside donors.

Leadership, staff changes at Made in Durham

Meredythe Holmes, founding executive director of Made in Durham, has resigned, and Casey Steinbacher, CEO of Casey’s Company and former CEO of the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce, has been named interim executive director.

Steinbacher, a founding member of the Made in Durham board, will serve as interim executive director for three months while the board looks for a successor to Holmes.

Lorenza Wilkins, program manager for Triangle Literacy Center and president, chairman and CEO of Compass Youth Center in Warrenton, has been named senior director of programs and operations, succeeding Valerie Anderson, who left in September to become senior director of programs for the Emily Krzyzewski Center in Durham.

Deanna Knighton, career specialist and adjunct accounting instructor at Wake Technical Community College, has been named career development specialist, succeeding Dolan.

initiative develop career plans and career-readiness skills.

Dominique Oliver, a social worker for the Durham County Department of Social Services, has been named re-engagement specialist, a new position that will support expansion of Durham Futures with a three-year, $750,000 grant from the Oak Foundation.

Jacob Dolan has been promoted to employer engagement strategist.

Forsyth United Way aims to raise $15.5 million

United Way Forsyth County has set a goal of $15.5 million for its annual campaign, $400,000 more than it raised a year ago.

Chairing the campaign, which on November 1 had raised 55 percent of its goal is John McConnell, CEO Emeritus of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Funds raised a year ago helped fund over 60 programs through over 40 agencies that served more than 78,000 residents of Forsyth County.

Chronic homelessness near zero in Guilford County

The number of cases of chronic homelessness in Guilford County fell to only three last summer from 143 in 2013, making the county one of only seven communities in the U.S. to attain or nearly reach a “sustainable zero” in chronic homelessness, according to the Phillips Foundation.

From 2013 to 2016, through United Way of Greater Greensboro, the Foundation invested a total of $1.96 million in Partners Ending Homelessness.

Based on an estimated cost to Guilford County taxpayers of roughly $30,000 a year in emergency services and subsidized care for each case of chronic homelessness, the Foundation says, its investment in the work of Partners Ending Homelessness helped save Guilford County taxpayers an average of $1.26 million a year over the life of the grant, or a total of $3.78 million.

Ties between foundations, grantees focus of report

Foundations can best strengthen their relationships with nonprofits they fund if they focus on understanding the nonprofits and the context in which they work, and if they are transparent with them, a new report says.

And the foundation program officer to whom a nonprofit grantee is assigned plays a crucial role in shaping how the nonprofit experiences its relationship with the foundation, says the report, Relationships Matter: Program Officers, Grantees, and the Keys to Success, from the Center for Effective Philanthropy.

The report, based on the perspectives of nearly 20,000 grantees of 86 foundations, also finds that nonprofit leaders value funders’ understanding of their organizations’ goals and strategies; the challenges they face; the communities and fields in which they work; the social, cultural, and economic context in which they work; and the needs of their ultimate beneficiaries.

Hotel Association collecting items for homeless

Through November 30, the Guilford County Hotel Association is collecting donated sheets, towels, blankets, pillows, and other linens for distribution through the Salvation Army, Greensboro Urban Ministry, Barnabas Network and other agencies to the homeless population.

Donated items can be dropped off in Greensboro at Greensboro Marriott Downtown at 304 North Greene St.; Courtyard by Marriott at 4400 West Wendover Ave; Hampton Inn and Suites Coliseum Area at 3033 West Gate City Blvd; and in High Point at Greensboro

Radisson at 135 South Main St.

Civic groups raise $13,500 for food for kids in need

The Nat Greene Kiwanis club in Greensboro and the eight Rotary Clubs of Greensboro raised over $13,500 at a golf event October 31 at Bryan Park Golf Club for the Out of Garden Project, with proceeds to be used to provide all children in need at Allen Middle School and Southern Middle School with food backpacks for the entire school year.

Coles to head foundation at United Way

Cathy Coles, former special education teacher at the Triad Academy at Summit School, has been named executive director of the United Way of Forsyth County Foundation.

Coles, who previously served as executive director of Project Potential, will oversee the major gifts and planned giving programs at United Way, and will be responsible for overseeing the development and growth of the foundation’s philanthropic goals.

Food Bank honors donors, vice president

The Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina in Raleigh honored its top donors in fiscal 2016-17, including Food Lion, Walmart Foundation, Full House Farms, and Publix Super Markets Charities.

And it presented its annual Hunt-Morgridge Service Award to Earline Middleton, its vice president for agency services and programs.

Gunter honored by Goodwill

Michael D. Gunter, who retired last year as a partner at Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice in Winston-Salem, received the 2017 Heritage Award from Goodwill Industries of Northwest North Carolina.

The organization has presented the award, its highest honor, only four times in its 91-year history.

Thompson launches program for teenage girls in custody

Thompson in Matthews has began a program to provide short-term housing, assessment and “wraparound” services for females ages 12 to 17 in the custody of the Mecklenburg County Division of Youth and Family Services.

Dental foundation accepting grant applications

December 20 is the deadline for community-based oral health programs and organizations in North Carolin that focus on children’s oral health, particularly among underserved populations, to submit applications to the Delta Dental Foundation in Raleigh for grants that will total up to $45,000.

Jeffrey joins Cone Health Foundation board

Paul A. Jeffrey, president of Wesley Long Hospital in Greensboro and first chief inclusion office at Cone Health, has joined the board of directors of Cone Health Foundation.

John Rex Endowment board names new members, chair

The John Rex Endowment named three new board members, including consultant Warren Ludwig; John Rusher of Raleigh Pediatric Associates; and Kate Simpson, vice president of TrueBridge Capital Partners.

Linda Butler, vice president of medical affairs and chief medical officer at UNC REX Healthcare, is board chair.

Goodwill, Habitat team up on recycling drive

Triad Goodwill and Habitat for Humanity of Greater Greensboro are partnering on a recycling drive this weekend at Christ United Methodist Church at 410 N. Holden Road in Greensboro

The two agencies will collect donated clothing, linens, housewares, furniture and building supplies on November 18 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on November 19 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

They then will sort the items for distribution or for sale in their respective retail locations.

Board changes at Junior Achievement

Randy Brodd, a partner at Dixon Hughes Goodman, has been elected board chair at Junior Achievement of Eastern North Carolina, and Jon Dewar, president of LPL Financial, has been elected chair-elect.

Joining the board are Kevin McGarry, assistant vice president and relationship manager and PNC, and Felicia Woodard, senior vice president and market team lead for Triangle commercial banking at Bank of America.

Nonprofit news roundup, 11.10.17

Fundraising grows at nearly six in 10 charities

Fifty-seven percent of 1,104 charities in the U.S. and Canada saw growth in charitable revenues in the first half of 2017, and 75 percent were on track to meet their fundraising goals for the year, a new study says.

Larger charities were more more likely than the smallest organizations to be on track to meet their goals, while arts groups were more likely to be struggling to meet their goals, says the Summary 2017 Nonprofit Fundraising Study from the Nonprofit Research Collaborative.

Charitable revenue from major gifts grew at half the charities surveyed, with event revenue growing 47 percent, and online giving growing 48 percent.

Baby Boomers, or people born from 1946 through 1964, are the single  generation most likely to be the focus of charities communications, while fewer than half the charities said they were raising money or recruiting volunteers from Millennials, or people born from 1980 through 1995.

Endowment values grow at smaller foundations

Overall endowment values grew $200 million in 2016 to $3.7 billion at 876 foundations  that were at least three years old and had assets under $50 million, a new report says.

Foundations allocated 48.2 percent of their assets to equities in 2016, up from 46.7 percent in 2015, says the 2017 Report on Private Foundation Investment Performance from Foundation Source.

Excluding charitable expenses, the report says, foundations of all sizes granted more than the five percent minimum distribution that was required.

High Point University gets $1 million for planetarium

High Point University has received a $1 million gift from Robert G. Culp III,  executive chairman of Culp Inc. in High Point and treasurer of the University’s board of trustees, and his wife, Susan Culp, and their family, for a future planetarium on the school’s campus.

Vision for High Point, professional growth focus of summit

High Point’s vision for the future, as well as professional growth and community involvement, will be the focus of the second annual Young Professionals Summit on November 14.

Hosted by Young Leaders United, a group at United Way of Greater High Point, the event will beheld  from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the High Point University Community Center.

Feature speakers include Greg Demko, High Point city manager; Patrick Chapin, president and CEO of Business High Point – Chamber of Commerce; and Nikki Lee, sales and events manager of Radisson High Point.

Women’s Giving Network gives $95,800

The Women’s Giving Network of Wake County, a program of the North Carolina Community Foundation, awarded three grants totaling $95,800, bringing its cumulative grantmaking to over $1.1 million.

Energy United giving $40,000 to teachers

EnergyUnited Electric Membership Corporation in Statesville is awarding a total of over $40,000 to nearly 40 teachers to fund classroom learning projects serving over 12,000 students at schools in Alexander, Cabarrus, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Guilford, Iredell, Mecklenburg, Randolph, Rowan and Wilkes counties.

Women in Motion gets $1,000

Pinnacle Financial Partners has made an endowment gift of $1,000 to the Women in Motion Fund of the High Point Community Foundation, becoming its first corporate donor.

The gift will be matched by The L. Paul Brayton family, which made an initial gift of $500,000 to establish the Women in Motion Fund.

The initiative has raised half the funds it needs to meet a second matching gift of $250,000 the family has made for funds the initiative raises by December 31.

Zimmerman named to task force and initiative

Tracy Zimmerman, executive director of the North Carolina Early Childhood Foundation , has been appointed to the new Birth-to-Eight Interagency Task Force at the North Carolina General Assembly.

Zimmerman also has been named to participate in My Future NC, an initiative that will bring together state leaders in education, business, philanthropy, faith, nonprofits and and state government to create an agenda and education plan to make the state more competitive.

Vellani by Triangle Sons and Daughters of Italy in America

Larry Vellani, CEO of Smart Start of Forsyth County, has been named Outstanding Italian American in North Carolina in 2017 by the Triangle Sons and Daughters of Italy in America.

Pro Fee donates socks for hurricane victims

Pro Feet in Burlington donated 30,000 pairs of socks to victims of Hurricane Harvey in Texas.

The American Red Cross and other nonprofits in Houston, Corpus Christi and San Antonio and smaller communities outside Houston distributed the socks.

Habitat gets 10 donated storage units

Local UNITS owners Sabrah and Bill Hardin donated 10 portable storage units to Habitat for Humanity of Greater Greensboro for its effort to build five homes in one week on Asher Downs Drive in northern Greensboro.

The effort involved 20 homebuilders, 50 contractors, and hundreds of volunteers.

Junior League to host holiday market

The Junior League of Winston-Salem will host its eighth annual holiday shopping market, Boutique, on Nov. 17 and 18 in the Grand Pavilion Ballroom in the lower level of the Embassy Suites in downtown Winston-Salem.

Welborn Academy getting donated instruments

Triangle-based National Pawn is donating over 100 musical instruments and $2,000 for instrument upkeep to Welborn Academy of Science & Technology in High Point.

Sozo Children to host annual dinner

Sozo Children, a nonprofit ministry serving children in Uganda, will host its annual fundraising dinner on November 14 at WinMock at Kinderton in Bermuda Run at 5:30 p.m.

Women’s Leadership Council recognizes award-winners

The Women’s Leadership Council at United Way of Forsyth County presented awards at its 10th Annual Celebration Dinner at the Millennium Center on November 1.

Awards and winners are:

* Outstanding Volunteer: Alexis Thompson.

* Outstanding Corporate: Wake Forest University,

* Outstanding Youth: Jalissa Johnson, eighth-grader at East Forsyth Middle School.

* Outstanding Educator: Dossie Poteat, principal at East Forsyth Middle School.

* Susan Cameron Award: Priscilla Green.

Board and staff changes at Triangle United Way

Jes Averhart, executive director of Leadership Triangle, and Michael Botzis, an assurance partner with RSM US, have joined the board of directors of United Way of the Greater Triangle.

Also joining United Way are Caren Howley, former associate director for alumni engagement and employer strategy for Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who has been named vice president of strategic partnerships; Emily Page, president of Creative Knowing Consultancy, who has been named senior director of talent development; and Olivia Morris, controller at International Farming Corp., who has been named chief financial officer.

Greene County funder gives $4,200

Greene County Community Foundation, an affiliate of the North Carolina Community Foundation, awarded four grants totaling $4,210.