Nonprofit news roundup, 11.17.17

Donor-advised funds surge

Total assets available to donor-advised fund accounts for grantmaking grew 9.7 percent to $85.15 billion in 2016, while grants from donor-advised funds to qualified charities represent four percent of all individual giving and grew 10.4 percent to $15.75 billion for a payout rate of 20.03 percent, a new report says.

Contributions to donor-advised funds grew 7.6 percent to $23.27 billion in 2016, and the number of donor-advised fund accounts grew 6.9 percent to 284,965, says the 2017 Donor-Advised Fund Report from the National Philanthropic Trust.

The average size of donor-advised fund accounts grew 2.6 percent to a record-high $298,809.

Massachusetts was home to 82,643 individual donor-advised funds, the most in any state,  and their grant value totaled $3.1 billion, while contributions to them totaled $5.18 billion, both the highest of any state.

Donor-advised fund charitable assets under management totaled $18.89 billion, the most of any state, while nearly half of all donor-advised fund accounts were sponsored by charities in Massachusetts, California and Pennsylvania.

Donor-advised funds are the fastest growing vehicle for charitable giving in the U.S., the National Philanthropic Trust says.

Giving circles raise nearly $1.3 billion

The number of collective-giving groups, known as giving circles, have tripled since 2007, engaged at least 150,000 individuals in all 50 states, and given up to $1.29 billion, a new study says.

Women represent 70 percent of all giving-circle members, while a specific shared identity, such as gender, race, age or religion, is the basis of 60 percent of all giving circles, says The Landscape of Giving Circles/Collective Giving Groups in the U.S. — 2016, from the Collective Giving Research Group, with support from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University.

While men are members of 66 percent of giving circles, the study says, they represent the majority of members in only 7.5 percent of groups.

The minimum dollar contribution required to join a giving circle ranges from under $20 to $2 million, and the average donation was $1,312, compared to $2,809i 2007.

Twenty-five networks of giving circles have emerged, representing 45 percent of giving circles.

In addition to donations from their members, 52 percent of giving circles receive additional funds from community foundations, corporate partners and other outside donors.

Leadership, staff changes at Made in Durham

Meredythe Holmes, founding executive director of Made in Durham, has resigned, and Casey Steinbacher, CEO of Casey’s Company and former CEO of the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce, has been named interim executive director.

Steinbacher, a founding member of the Made in Durham board, will serve as interim executive director for three months while the board looks for a successor to Holmes.

Lorenza Wilkins, program manager for Triangle Literacy Center and president, chairman and CEO of Compass Youth Center in Warrenton, has been named senior director of programs and operations, succeeding Valerie Anderson, who left in September to become senior director of programs for the Emily Krzyzewski Center in Durham.

Deanna Knighton, career specialist and adjunct accounting instructor at Wake Technical Community College, has been named career development specialist, succeeding Dolan.

initiative develop career plans and career-readiness skills.

Dominique Oliver, a social worker for the Durham County Department of Social Services, has been named re-engagement specialist, a new position that will support expansion of Durham Futures with a three-year, $750,000 grant from the Oak Foundation.

Jacob Dolan has been promoted to employer engagement strategist.

Forsyth United Way aims to raise $15.5 million

United Way Forsyth County has set a goal of $15.5 million for its annual campaign, $400,000 more than it raised a year ago.

Chairing the campaign, which on November 1 had raised 55 percent of its goal is John McConnell, CEO Emeritus of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Funds raised a year ago helped fund over 60 programs through over 40 agencies that served more than 78,000 residents of Forsyth County.

Chronic homelessness near zero in Guilford County

The number of cases of chronic homelessness in Guilford County fell to only three last summer from 143 in 2013, making the county one of only seven communities in the U.S. to attain or nearly reach a “sustainable zero” in chronic homelessness, according to the Phillips Foundation.

From 2013 to 2016, through United Way of Greater Greensboro, the Foundation invested a total of $1.96 million in Partners Ending Homelessness.

Based on an estimated cost to Guilford County taxpayers of roughly $30,000 a year in emergency services and subsidized care for each case of chronic homelessness, the Foundation says, its investment in the work of Partners Ending Homelessness helped save Guilford County taxpayers an average of $1.26 million a year over the life of the grant, or a total of $3.78 million.

Ties between foundations, grantees focus of report

Foundations can best strengthen their relationships with nonprofits they fund if they focus on understanding the nonprofits and the context in which they work, and if they are transparent with them, a new report says.

And the foundation program officer to whom a nonprofit grantee is assigned plays a crucial role in shaping how the nonprofit experiences its relationship with the foundation, says the report, Relationships Matter: Program Officers, Grantees, and the Keys to Success, from the Center for Effective Philanthropy.

The report, based on the perspectives of nearly 20,000 grantees of 86 foundations, also finds that nonprofit leaders value funders’ understanding of their organizations’ goals and strategies; the challenges they face; the communities and fields in which they work; the social, cultural, and economic context in which they work; and the needs of their ultimate beneficiaries.

Hotel Association collecting items for homeless

Through November 30, the Guilford County Hotel Association is collecting donated sheets, towels, blankets, pillows, and other linens for distribution through the Salvation Army, Greensboro Urban Ministry, Barnabas Network and other agencies to the homeless population.

Donated items can be dropped off in Greensboro at Greensboro Marriott Downtown at 304 North Greene St.; Courtyard by Marriott at 4400 West Wendover Ave; Hampton Inn and Suites Coliseum Area at 3033 West Gate City Blvd; and in High Point at Greensboro

Radisson at 135 South Main St.

Civic groups raise $13,500 for food for kids in need

The Nat Greene Kiwanis club in Greensboro and the eight Rotary Clubs of Greensboro raised over $13,500 at a golf event October 31 at Bryan Park Golf Club for the Out of Garden Project, with proceeds to be used to provide all children in need at Allen Middle School and Southern Middle School with food backpacks for the entire school year.

Coles to head foundation at United Way

Cathy Coles, former special education teacher at the Triad Academy at Summit School, has been named executive director of the United Way of Forsyth County Foundation.

Coles, who previously served as executive director of Project Potential, will oversee the major gifts and planned giving programs at United Way, and will be responsible for overseeing the development and growth of the foundation’s philanthropic goals.

Food Bank honors donors, vice president

The Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina in Raleigh honored its top donors in fiscal 2016-17, including Food Lion, Walmart Foundation, Full House Farms, and Publix Super Markets Charities.

And it presented its annual Hunt-Morgridge Service Award to Earline Middleton, its vice president for agency services and programs.

Gunter honored by Goodwill

Michael D. Gunter, who retired last year as a partner at Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice in Winston-Salem, received the 2017 Heritage Award from Goodwill Industries of Northwest North Carolina.

The organization has presented the award, its highest honor, only four times in its 91-year history.

Thompson launches program for teenage girls in custody

Thompson in Matthews has began a program to provide short-term housing, assessment and “wraparound” services for females ages 12 to 17 in the custody of the Mecklenburg County Division of Youth and Family Services.

Dental foundation accepting grant applications

December 20 is the deadline for community-based oral health programs and organizations in North Carolin that focus on children’s oral health, particularly among underserved populations, to submit applications to the Delta Dental Foundation in Raleigh for grants that will total up to $45,000.

Jeffrey joins Cone Health Foundation board

Paul A. Jeffrey, president of Wesley Long Hospital in Greensboro and first chief inclusion office at Cone Health, has joined the board of directors of Cone Health Foundation.

John Rex Endowment board names new members, chair

The John Rex Endowment named three new board members, including consultant Warren Ludwig; John Rusher of Raleigh Pediatric Associates; and Kate Simpson, vice president of TrueBridge Capital Partners.

Linda Butler, vice president of medical affairs and chief medical officer at UNC REX Healthcare, is board chair.

Goodwill, Habitat team up on recycling drive

Triad Goodwill and Habitat for Humanity of Greater Greensboro are partnering on a recycling drive this weekend at Christ United Methodist Church at 410 N. Holden Road in Greensboro

The two agencies will collect donated clothing, linens, housewares, furniture and building supplies on November 18 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on November 19 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

They then will sort the items for distribution or for sale in their respective retail locations.

Board changes at Junior Achievement

Randy Brodd, a partner at Dixon Hughes Goodman, has been elected board chair at Junior Achievement of Eastern North Carolina, and Jon Dewar, president of LPL Financial, has been elected chair-elect.

Joining the board are Kevin McGarry, assistant vice president and relationship manager and PNC, and Felicia Woodard, senior vice president and market team lead for Triangle commercial banking at Bank of America.

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