Nonprofit news roundup, 03.17.17

Nonprofits overlook mid-level donors, study says

Many nonprofits are not paying enough attention to mid-level donors, who fall into a communications “black hole” and are “forgotten by the organizations they faithfully support,” a new study says.

For the study, online-fundraising consultant NextAfter made donations ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 to 37 organizations, then tracked emails, direct mail and phone calls it received from those organizations for 90 days.

Only eight percent of the groups phoned to say thank you. One-third never referred to their donors by name. Only 31 percent of communications came from a real person. And 49 percent of organizations never asked for a second gift.

In contrast, NextAfter says, most nonprofits have standard procedures for responding to smaller gifts — usually email or direct mail — and to larger gifts.

Major donors, it says, typically receive a phone call from a representative of the organization. And previous research, it says, indicates that a donor’s second gift may be up to 40 percent more if he or she received a thank-you call for the first gift.

Among organizations in the most recent study, 40 percent stopped communicating after one month, and nine percent did not communicate at all — providing no gift receipt, appeal for more donations, or new information about the organization.

“In other words, they provided no incentive to give again,” NextAfter says.

Scholarship fund created for ex-convicts

The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation has established a $100,000 fund at The Winston-Salem Foundation named for Darryl Hunt to provide scholarships to individuals in Winston-Salem and Forsyth County who have been convicted of a criminal offense, have served a jail or prison sentence, and are seeking higher education.

Starting Jan. 1, 2018, applicants may apply for a $1,000 scholarship that is renewable for up to three more consecutive years and will be applied to the cost of tuition and fees for students attending an accredited vocational or technical school, community college, or college or university for a certificate, diploma or degree.

Hunt was wrongfully convicted of rape and murder in 1984 at age 19 and served two decades in prison before being exonerated.

Food Bank launching teaching kitchen

The Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina is partnering with Allscripts Healthcare Solutions to launch the Allscripts Teaching Kitchen – a new space to be used to teach cooking skills, share healthy recipes, and offer nutrition education to organizations serving families and individuals facing hunger.

The Teaching Kitchen will operate under the Food Bank’s recently launched Community Health & Engagement department. The partnership aims to boost the continued development of a nutrition education program for the on-site teaching kitchen, as well as collaboration with other nonprofits to bring nutrition education and resources to people who are at-risk of hunger.

Thompson names new CEO

Will Jones, former chief operating officer at Eckerd Youth Alternatives in Clearwater, Fla., and more recently senior child well-being industry consultant in Charlotte for SAS, leading efforts to build a national child well-being practice for the Cary-based company, has been named president and CEO of Thompson, a Charlotte-based provider of clinical and prevention services for vulnerable children and families in Mecklenburg County.

Stowe Botanical Garden gets new executive director

Patrick S. Larkin, senior vice president of gardens at Cheekwood in Nashville, Tenn., has been named executive director of Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden in Belmont, N.C., effective May 15.

Tomorrow Fund launching final campaign

The Tomorrow Fund for Hispanic students will launch its final fundraising campaign on March 31, aiming to raise $135,000 to support students completion of their degrees over the next three years.

Over eight years, the Fund has provided nearly $1 million in scholarship funding across North Carolina.
Sisters of Mercy Foundation awards $1 million

Sisters of Mercy of North Carolina Foundation awarded grants totaling over $1 million to 22 nonprofits in Buncombe, Catawba, Gaston, Mecklenburg and Union counties.

ALS research to benefit from new marathon

Event organizers FS Series, Team Drea Foundation and The Streets at Southpoint have organized the inaugural Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Marathon and Half Marathon, which will be held November 12, start and finish at The Streets at Southpoint shopping mall in Durham, and raise funds to find a cure for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

Boys & Girls Clubs get $2,000

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wake County received $2,000 from Delta Dental Foundation for an oral health education program at Washington Elementary Boys & Girls Club.

Event raises $2,810 for Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

A Boston Butt Cook-off contest at Ray Price Harley-Davidson in Raleigh attracted over 500 people and raised $2,810 for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation.

Arts Council gives $6,000

The Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County awarded 12 grants totaling $6,000 through its Wells Fargo Community Enrichment Mini-Grant program to community groups and individuals.

College students volunteer for Habitat

Students from colleges and universities in New York and Pennsylvania are spending a week in Greensboro this month working with Habitat for Humanity of Greater Greensboro on new construction, home renovations or at the Habitat ReStore in Gate City Boulevard.

The students attend Eastern University in Wayne, Pa.; Widener University in Chester, Pa.; University of Rochester in New York; Kutztown University of Pennsylvania; and Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y.

Fraternity raises money for wounded veteran (photo)

Veteran Patrick J. Glavey is getting a Track Chair — an all-terrain wheelchair — thanks to fundraising efforts by the Kappa Alpha Order fraternity at High Point University in partnership with The Independence Fund and the Heal Team 6 organization.

Schools get $19,450

The Principals’ Fund at the High Point Community Foundation awarded a total of $19,450 to eight local schools.

Event raises $15,000 for Mustard Seed

Nonprofit news roundup on March 3 incorrectly reported the amount of money Mustard Seed Community Health in Greensboro received from the inaugural Scrubs vs. Suits MD/JD Challenge basketball game. Mustard Seed received $15,000.

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