Giving grows at slower pace

Overall charitable giving and online giving both grew in 2012 but at a slower pace than a year earlier, a new report says.

Overall giving grew 1.7 percent in 2012, down from 4.2 percent a year earlier, while online giving grew 10.7 percent, down from 13 percent, says the Charitable Giving Report from Blackbaud.

Overall giving throughout most of 2012 was about flat, with year-end fundraising boosted by relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

Overall giving is “not likely to increase significantly until there is sustained growth in new donors, nonprofits rebuild their multi-year donor base, and overall donor retention improves,” says the report, which was based on data from 3,144 nonprofits that raised a total of $7.9 billion overall and from 2,581 nonprofits that raised a total of $512 million online.

Overall fundraising for nonprofits that raised less than $1 million grew 7.3 percent, compared to 2.7 percent for those that raised $1 million to $10 million, and 0.3 percent for those that raised over $10 million.

Giving to faith-based groups grew 6.1 percent and giving to education institutions grew 1.9 percent, two sectors that together accounted for 45 percent of all charitable giving in the U.S.

Giving overall grew 1.6 percent for environmental and animal welfare groups, and 1.5 percent for arts and culture groups, while it fell 4.7 percent for international affairs groups, 3.4 percent for health care groups, 1.2 percent for human services groups, and 0.5 percent for public and society benefit groups.

Online fundraising, which represented 7 percent of all giving in 2012, up from 6.3 percent in 2011, accounted for 8.3 percent of overall giving for groups that raised less than $1 million overall, 7.5 percent for groups that raised over $10 million overall, and 6 .1 percent for groups that raised $1 million to $10 million overall.

Online giving accounted for 14.2 percent of overall giving for healthcare; 11.8 percent for international affairs; 6.8 percent for environment and animal welfare; 6.1 percent for human services; 5.9 percent for arts and culture; 5.3 percent for public and society benefit; and 4.5 percent for education.

Todd Cohen

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